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Lucidity

It’s sort of weird if you think about it. We live in a pretty apathetic age, yet we’re surrounded by an enormous amount of information about other people. If you feel like it, you can easily gather that information about them. Having said that, we still hardly know anything about people.

—    Haruki Murakami, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage  (via notimeforyoutowaste)

(Source: larmoyante, via constrictions)

"I’m very shy,” O’Brien says. “I  wish more people believed me when I say that. Stiles is a version of me that rarely exists in the real world. He’s so confident and extroverted, and I’m much more restrained and internal.

(Source: leaveatrail, via fyesdylanobrien)

Is the soul solid, like iron?
Or is it tender and breakable, like
the wings of a moth in the beak of the owl?

—    Mary Oliver, from “Some Questions You Might Ask” House of Light (Beacon Press, 1990)

(Source: sacredgraffiti, via howitzerliterarysociety)

I got new headphones today and music sounds so beautiful I might cry. 

So you plant your own garden and
decorate your own soul, instead of waiting
for someone to bring you flowers

—     Jorge Luis Borges, “After a While” (translated by Veronica A. Shofstall)

(Source: feellng, via rawstones)

likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being

"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography.

Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being.

Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”